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Social Sciences and Fine Arts

Fine Arts Courses

AR 101 Introduction to Art 3 credits
This course covers major art trends and their place in history. The content includes art media, techniques, elements and principles of design, art criticism, and aesthetics. English Placement Level: EN 093/094.

AR 103 Drawing 3 credits
This course covers basic drawing concepts with studio investigation of line, shape, value, form, and space. Various drawing media are introduced, and student work will be matted and presented in an art exhibit. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 073/074. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered as needed)

AR 135 Studio for Non-Majors 3 credits
This is an introductory studio art course designed to give students a basic understanding of the creative process, exposure to art works of professionally and historically relevant artists, and the experience of working in a variety of art media. This course is of value to students, such as elementary school teachers, who need knowledge of a diverse range of art forms. This course also contributes to a well-rounded education that includes understanding and appreciation of the arts, practice in creative problem solving, and the development of a leisure activity for personal satisfaction. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

AR 214 Ceramics 3 credits
Painting is a specialized course for those individuals interested in developing painting skills for personal enhancement, and for those students who need to establish a portfolio of work for transferring to an art program at another school.
The arts convey knowledge and meaning not learned through the study of other subjects. They represent a form of thinking and a way of knowing that is based in human imagination and judgement. The arts provide pleasure, but they are also intellectual disciplines of substance. Like language or mathematic, the arts involve the use of complex symbols to communicate. The study of art engages students in learning activities which require use of higher-order thinking skills like analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. This course will help students develop these abilities, enrich their knowledge and experience, and broaden their perspective on the world around them.

AR 216 Ceramics 3 credits
This course introduces the student to the various techniques of ceramics production (pinch, slab, coil, and wheel throwing) for creating functional and decorative objects. English Placement Level: EN 073/074. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

AR 216 FS Ceramics 3 credits
This course offers the student the opportunity to continue skill building that was introduced in the beginning ceramics course, and concentrate the focus of their study in a specialized direction as discussed with and determined by the instructor. Focused study may include wheel thrown forms, ceramic sculpture, and developing the students’ ability to successfully operate electric and combustion kilns. Prerequisite: AR 216 or instructor’s permission. English Placement Level: EN 073/074. (Offered Fall and Spring)

DR 120 Drama in Education 3 credits
This is an introductory course in drama. Emphasis is on drama in education and will prepare a student to “stand and deliver” the CNMI Standards and Benchmarks in Drama, and to show how drama can be used as a teaching medium. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 083/084. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

DR 202 Acting 3 credits
This is an introductory course in acting which covers both improvisation and method acting techniques. Acting exercises, theater games, and scene studies are required class projects. Participation in NMC theater productions is by competitive audition and is an optional course activity. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

MU 109 Ukulele 3 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the Hawaiian musical instrument known as the ukulele. This ukulele course will take students to who have little to no experience in playing a musical instrument, and give them the ability and confidence to play the basic chords and several songs on the ukulele. Students will learn the history, development, styles, parts, tuning, care and maintenance of the ukulele as well as the fundamentals of music theory such as notes, scales, rhythm, timing, and chord families. This practical, hands-on course will focus on strumming various ukulele chords, and singing songs while playing. Students will gain the knowledge and skills to continue their learning path on their own after completing this course.

Social Sciences Courses

BE 111 College Success 3 credits
This course is designed to help students become successful in college by developing and practicing academic skills in reading, writing, listening, critical thinking, note taking, studying, memorizing, and test taking, and time management techniques, and by promoting personal responsibility, self-confidence, and awareness of self and others. This course also familiarizes students with college services and resources and explores career and further education options. This course replaces BE 110 College Life Skills. English Placement Level: EN 083/084. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

GE 201 World Regional Geography 3 credits
This course is a survey of the major populated geographic regions of the world. Emphasis is placed on how globalization affects the unique nature of regions, the interrelationships of cultures and the landscapes they occupy, and contemporary patterns and problems of economic and social development, environmental issues, and political and religious conflicts. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 101. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

HI 101 The American Nation I 3 credits
This is an introductory survey course in American History from the pre-Columbian era to the end of the Civil War. Emphasis is on the political, economic, and social development of the North American continent, from the earliest European migrations through the rise of the United States as an American nation to the end of the Civil War. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall)

HI 102 The American Nation II 3 credits
This is an introductory survey course in American history from the post-Civil War Reconstruction era to the present. Emphasis is on the political, economic, and social developments and changes in the United States and the role the United States has played in major world events since the late 19th century, with special reference to Pacific and Asian issues in American foreign affairs and national development. Prerequisite(s): None. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Spring)

HI 121 History of World Civilizations I 3 credits
This course is the first half of a comprehensive two-course sequence. This course provides students with a general overview of world history from the Paleolithic Period (the Old Stone Age) and the origins of civilizations (agriculture and the first cities) in the Neolithic Period (the New Stone Age) to the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century, and the age of European exploration and colonization in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. This course seeks to contribute to a well-rounded education by tracing changes in technologies, social and governmental structures, and ideologies and religions. Prerequisites: None. English Placement Level: EN 101. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall)

HI 122 History of World Civilizations II 3 credits
This course is the second part of a comprehensive two-semester sequence. It surveys the history of world civilization from about 1650 to the present. Emphasis is placed on changes in technologies, ideologies, and social, economic, and governmental structures. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 101. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Spring)

HI 235 Introduction to Japanese History and Culture 3 credits
This course provides an overview of Japanese history and culture from prehistoric to modern times. The primary goal is to provide students with an understanding of contemporary Japan by tracing and analyzing its historical, political, and cultural developments. Topics covered include origin myths, Chinese influence, Heian Japan, Rise of the Samurai, Meiji restoration, and post war Japan. Japan as a major global player is also placed on how to read and interpret primary and secondary sources to acquire historical understanding.

HI 255 History of the Northern Mariana Islands 3 credits
This course offers an overview of Northern Marianas history in its global context from prehistoric times up to the Covenant and the Constitution establishing the CNMI. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

PS 110 Principles of Democratic Institutions 3 credits
This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the principles and processes of democratic government as developed and practiced in the United States. Emphasis is on the concepts and procedures relating to the development of public policy. Attention is given to current issues at the national, state, and local government levels in the U.S. as well as to issues of specific concern to the CNMI. Prerequisite: CO 210, or concurrent enrollment. English Placement Level: EN 101. Math Placement Level: MA 091. (Offered Fall and Spring)

PY 101 General Psychology 3 credits
This introductory course provides an overview of the field of psychology and of its fundamental concepts, theories, methods, history, and scope of study. This course covers introductory behavioral research methods; basic brain anatomy, brain chemistry, and the interrelationships of the human brain, the human body, and behavior; learning principles; memory; personality and theories of personality; abnormal behavior, personality disorders, and addictions; and standard treatments for common psychological and neurological disorders. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 101. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

PY 102 Abnormal Psychology 3 credits

PY 201 Human Growth and Development 3 credits
This course is an introduction to normal human development over the life span. Concepts, issues, and theories of human growth and development are explored within the context of a multi-disciplinary systems approach. The focus is on the interrelation of physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional changes in the individual over the life span. Prerequisite: PY 101 or instructor’s approval. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Spring)

PY 202 Spirit, Mind, and Body 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the current theories and research in spirituality, psychology and the mind/body experience. This course will provide the student with a basic understanding of spirituality, world religions, human growth and the physiological elements of human development toward congruence.

SO 101 Introduction to Sociology 3 credits
This is an introductory course covering the basic concepts, methods, and theories of sociology. This course explores, in local and global contexts, elements of social life, including history, culture, socialization, various social structural contexts, social stratification variables such as status, prestige, race and ethnicity, gender, education, etc., economic and political institutions, and explanations for criminal deviance and other deviant behavior, social control, and social change. Prerequisite: None. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Fall and Spring)

SO 210 Sociology of Love, Marriage, and Family Relationships 3 credits
This course introduces the sociological study of love relationships, marriages, and family relationships through various analytical sociological methods such as the primary areas of social reality, structural functionalism, and social conflict theory. Primary topics examined include the definition and meaning of love; dating and courtship behavior; behavior in marriage unions; positive and negative interpersonal communication; human sexual behavior in relationships; parenting; stake issues in love relationships and families; economics needs and divisions of labor in love relationships, marriages, and families; divorce; and remarriage. In addition, this course will examine various types of sociological experiences that affect love relationships, marriages, and families such as historical experiences, types of social structures, power implementation in relationships, deviant behavior, social status and prestige issues, health care issues, and access to technology. Prerequisite: SO 101. English Placement Level: EN 093/094. Math Placement Level: None. (Offered Spring)

SO 297 Current Issues in the CNMI 3 credits
This is a core course required for all NMC degrees. It is a capstone course for all associate degrees, and thus it is to be taken in a student’s last semester or next to last semester. For Elementary Education majors, it is to be taken in the second semester of a student’s sophomore year or in the first semester of a student’s junior year. SO 297 is a seminar-format course designed to assist students to become active, competent, and effective citizens of the CNMI. The course familiarizes students with current and future political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental issues and problems in the CNMI, which are then discussed and analyzed, and possible solutions are explored. Prerequisite: CO 210 with a grade of “C” or better, or concurrent enrollment. EN 101 with a grade of “C” or better. English Placement Level: EN 202. Math Placement Level: MA 091. (Offered Fall and Spring)

SW 103 Ethics in Social Work 3 credits

SW203 Introduction to Social Work 3 credits

SW251 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 credits
This course provides students with the theoretical foundation for understanding human behavior and development from a generalist social work perspective. The systems theory and several ecological theories are presented emphasizing their relationships with: (a) generalist social work practice, (b) culture and gender, (c) forms of oppression, and (d) social welfare issues in Saipan and Micronesia. Additional theoretical contributions from various sciences (Biology, Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, and Political Science) are examined.



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